partial area district map with colors and numbers

Redistricting California

 Redistricting Update: Courts Clear the Way for New Maps

The new district maps for state Assembly, Senate, Board of Equalization and Congressional districts will be used beginning with the 2012 June and November elections.

Find Your New District: 

At ReDrawCa.org, click on Find Your District, enter your zip code or address to see all of your districts. Along with new district lines, many districts also have new numbers. 

State Senate Districts
Did your district lines change for the 2012 elections? Your district numbers may have changed too! Find out if you are now in an even numbered state Senate district. If so, and you were previously in a odd numbered district, voting for state Senate will be DEFERRED.  Find out if your district will have a temporary state Senator.

Compare the 2001 and 2011 District Maps 

80 state Assembly Districts

40 state Senate Districts

4 state Board of Equalization Districts

53 California Congressional Districts

 Final commission report detailing their process and findings.

What Is a Deferred Voter?

In 2012 voters will elect new state senators in odd-numbered districts for new four year terms. Some voters may find themselves moved from an odd numbered to an even numbered senate district. For these voters, voting in a state Senate race will be DEFERRED until 2014. Find out more about the new districts and find your district. Find out if your district will have a temporary state Senator.

 Challenges :

Proposition 40: A referendum on the state senate maps has qualified for the November 2012 General Election ballot. 

A yes vote supports the new maps certified by the Commission and a no vote rejects the Commissions maps for state senate districts.

"To avoid uncertainty about which maps should be used in 2012 elections",the state Supreme Court has ruled that for the June and November 2012 ballot, the Commission’s certified (8/15/2011) senate district maps will be used. 

  • State Challenges: The California Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, denied two petitions challenging the validity of the state senate and congressional redistricting maps that had been certified by the Citizens Redistricting Commission. (October 26, 2011) 

Pre-clearance: Under the Section 5 provisions of the Voting Rights Act any changes to voting must be reviewed by the U.S. Department of Justice. 

Proposed voting changes must not deny or abridge the right to vote on account of race, color, or membership in a language minority group.

The commission was informed that the U.S. Attorney General does not object to the California maps submitted for pre-clearance . (January 17, 2012)

 The commission submitted the maps for Yuba, Monterey, Merced and Kings counties to the U.S. Department of Justice for review of their compliance with the Voting Rights Act.(November 15, 2011)

What Is Redistricting and Why Do We Do It Every 10 Years?

The United States Constitution directs Congress to count the total population in a federal census every ten years to determine representation in Congress. The 435 Congressional seats are then reallocated or reapportioned based on states' populations. Equal population is the primary criteria for reapportioning Congressional districts. 

California is the most populous state and has 53 representatives in the United States House of Representatives.

Ca congressional Districts 2001`

Read more about the Constitution and the history of the census......

States and Local Government Redistircting

States and communities must also realign political district boundaries with equal population and comply with the Voting Rights Act. Each elected official should represent approximately the same number of people maintaining the principal of ‘one person, one vote’.

This process is generally known as “redistricting.”Read more......

Learn about the ABC's of Redistricting, in  Breaking Ground, by Loyola Law Associate Professor Justin Levitt.

Local Redistricting:

 Many local counties, cities and special districts have not finished or even started their redistricting process. Check with your county clerk or the superintendent of your local school district or board of your community college district or other special district to find out how and when redistricting will take place and when public comment will be taken. 

Who is responsible for local redistricting? 

Local redistricting often draws little public attention. Yet, it is no less important for citizens to be represented and have fair districts drawn at the local level as it is at the state and federal level.

What impact does it have on me? 

All local governments that elect by district must, every ten years, redraw their district lines to assure that all districts have nearly equal population.

 Local redistricting involves any county, city, school district, community college district or special district that is divided into districts or divisions. These local government agencies are required to review their current district boundaries with new population figures from the 2010 census and engage in a redistricting process right along with the state.*

If districts are drawn that keep communities intact, people are better able to elect representatives who will further their interests. Frequently, local redistricting draws little attention. But it is no less important for citizens to be represented and have fair districts drawn at the local level than it is at the state and federal level.

*Some charter cities use the mid-decade federal census or an official city census as specified in their charters. 


The local governing body (board of supervisors, city council, school board, etc.) is generally responsible for adopting the new district lines. There may be an advisory committee, and for counties there is provision for a commission of elected county officials to do the redistricting if the Board of Supervisors fails to do it by November 1 of the year following the census. Charter cities and counties may set up their own process, such as a separate commission or task force.

What are the rules and criteria for local redistricting?

Redistricting criteria for state districts, the open meeting notifications and the public process mandated for the state redistricting commission does not necessarily apply at the local level.

The California Elections Code, Division 21 provides the statutory basis for redrawing the districts for county supervisors, city council members, and the governing boards of special districts. TheCalifornia Education Code provides for redistricting in school and community college districts that elect by trustee areas.

Note: The provisions of Propositions 11 and 20 that govern the selection and functioning of the Citizens Redistricting Commission apply only to redistricting of the state Senate, Assembly, and Board of Equalization and California’s Congressional districts. 

Do many local agencies elect their governing boards by districts?

The boards of supervisors of almost all 58 counties are elected by district. Charter and general law cities may elect their city councils by districts; approximately 30 do so. The governing boards of many school districts and some special districts are elected by divisions such as trustee areas or wards.

Cities and Counties:  Is your city/county a charter government or general law?

Charter government

In addition to the statutory requirements in the state Elections Code for charter cities and counties, your city or county charter will also have statutory requirements for the redistricting process. Read the charter carefully to find out WHO is responsible for redistricting and HOW the process is conducted. A few cities have appointed commissions. Many city and county district lines are redrawn by the sitting government body (just as the state and federal districts in California were redrawn by the legislature prior to 2011).

General law cities

The process is outlined in the state Elections Code, 21600-21606.

What is the process?

 The important thing to remember is that the redistricting criteria and open meeting notifications mandated for the state redistricting commission do not necessarily apply at the local level. The Brown Act governs meetings of local legislative bodies. Determine exactly what the rules are for meeting notices and how much notice is mandated for your local government bodies that are involved in redistricting.

Find out who did the redistricting after the 2000 census and contact them to learn more about how the process worked in 2001. Deadlines for redistricting and other criteria may be determined by local governing documents. Others, as required by state law, have to finish by November 1, 2011 (or March 1, 2012 for school and community college districts). Many are starting soon and some have already begun.

How can I participate in local redistricting?

Find out who is drawing the maps for districts and what information besides the census they are using to make their determinations about where lines should be drawn. Ask your county registrar and county superintendent of schools. In addition, you can consult your county counsel, city clerk, city attorney, special district managers or legal departments for information about local redistricting. 

Regardless of what the rules and notice requirements are, you can advocate locally for an open, transparent process, extensive public input and recognition of neighborhoods and communities of interest in the redistricting process. 


New Information

Mar 19 2012 - 11:11am
The new district maps for state Assembly, Senate, Board of Equalization and Congressional districts will be used beginning with the 2012 June and November elections. Referendum: A referendum challenging the state senate maps has...
Apr 18 2011 - 12:52pm
A great mapping tool now presents the Citizens Redistricting Commission's final certified state maps in a very handy way. Click on Find Your District, enter your zipcode  or address and ReDrawCa.org gives you a list of your state Assembly,...
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